Courses

Course Area
Introduction to Comparative Politics Political Science
Civil War in Ancient and Modern Thought Political Science
The Rise and Fall of Yugoslav Idea in International Context International Relations
Nationalism, Ethnic Conflict, and Political Violence Political Science
What is Political Philosophy? Political Science
Political Philosophy and Foreign Policy International Relations
On Tyranny Political Science
Homer and Herodotus: Human Diversity and World Politics Political Science
Ancient and Modern Political Speechwriting Political Science
Introduction to Media and Communication Media Studies
Privatized Public Sphere: Social and Civic Implications of Platform Governance Media Studies
Seminar on the American Political Regime American Politics
Trolling, Cyberbullying, Harassment: Toward Digital Dignity Media Studies
Evil in Eastern Europe Culture
Structure of Slavic Languages Slavic
Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian Slavic
History of Economic Thought Economics
Economic Growth and Development Economics
International Financial Management Economics
Open-Economy Macro: A Transition Country’s Perspective Economics
Modern Approaches to Corruption Public Policy
Europeanization and International State-building Policies in the Balkans Public Policy
Forced Migrations along the “Balkan Route”: Bridging the Middle East and Europe International Relations
Cultural Policies of Post-Conflict Reconstruction in Southeast Europe Political Science
Sociology of Social Change Sociology
International Business Environment Economics
Civil Society and Political Culture in South-Eastern Europe Sociology
European Business Law Law
Corporate Crises Law
Exercising Leadership: an Introduction Online course
Internship module

INTRODUCTION TO COMPARATIVE POLITICS

Why are some countries richer than others? Why are citizens of some countries freer than citizens of other countries? Does more individual freedom mean more individual wealth? Does correlation mean causation? When should we aggregate and when should we disaggregate social facts in our quest for understanding social trends? This course will equip students with knowledge of fundamental concepts, basic controversies, and key approaches to thinking about domestic political phenomena such as: state, nation, ethnicity, political violence, political systems, freedom and equality, political transitions, external influences on domestic politics, political ideologies, amongst other pertinent topics. Students will also learn how to recognize the three fundamental approaches in assessing the drivers of political life: rational choice of individuals, political structures, and political cultures, and how not to be a slave to any one of them. Last, students will be introduced to the fundamentals of comparative politics’ methodology: independent and dependent variables, how to compare cases, and when to use qualitative versus quantitative research techniques. Students will learn by applying each concept against a country they are already familiar with throughout the semester. They will further learn by simulating a political conflict in a country, where a “Status Quo” team will try to defend the existing regime against the “Transition” team promoting change. Team strategies will be based on an in-depth application of concepts and theories learned throughout the course. Students will also write an explanatory paper by the end of the semester. By the end of this course, students will command basic concepts employed in describing domestic political institutions. Students will also become able to recognize implicit theoretical frameworks in contemporary political debates in media or in personal conversations. Lastly, students will learn how to select and compare cases to reach plausible conclusions, thus empowering their arguments in public policy debates.

POLITICAL SCIENCE 1020

3 CREDITS

Instructor: Mladen Mrdalj

CIVIL WAR IN ANCIENT AND MODERN THOUGHT

Ancient Greeks found civil war worse than conventional war as much as they found conventional war worse than peace. In fact, Aristotle, Thucydides, Polybius, and other ancient thinkers left detailed deliberations on the causes and dynamics of civil war. The ideas of philosophers such as Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau on preserving civil order will also be discussed before moving on to modern scholarship revolving around the “greed vs. grievances vs. state capacity” debates, including the proxy character of civil wars. Throughout the course, students will discuss and write papers comparing case studies ranging from the civil war in the ancient Greek polis of Korkyra, to the civil wars of the Roman Empire, the English and American Civil Wars, and the civil wars of the 20th century: Russia, China, and the communist-fascist-capitalist triangle. Lastly, civil wars in Yugoslavia, Ukraine, and Syria will be highlighted, with a focus on these events’ relevance in the current international system. In the last intellectual exercise for this course, each student will write a paper outlining and detailing a scenario of how a civil war would play out in their respective neighborhood, town, region and country. Papers will be presented to the course for an open discussion. Learning outcomes: students will become familiar with civil war in historical perspective; they will learn basic theories concerning causes of civil wars’ onset, dynamics, and ending, and decide which one makes most sense to them; they will be able to distinguish between various types of civil wars; and, lastly, students will learn how to zoom out of solely domestic causes of civil wars and recognize the international drivers behind seemingly internal war. Students will leave the course with an increased sensitivity to signs of relevant social fracturing and conditions that might escalate into civil war “back home”.

POLITICAL SCIENCE 2050

3 CREDITS

Instructor: Mladen Mrdalj

THE RISE AND FALL OF YUGOSLAV IDEA IN INTERNATIONAL CONTEXT

International students learn about the former Yugoslavia mostly in relation to the onset of World War I. This course aspires to go beyond that episode and balance between simplifying complex historical details and illuminating essential controversies of the Yugoslav experience. The violent collapse of Yugoslavia in Europe’s backyard hurt hopes for global peace following the end of the Cold War. Yugoslav civil wars still cast a shadow over contemporary international politics. The protracted conflict over Kosovo is troubling to both normative and geopolitical dimensions of international relations. NATO military intervention without the mandate of the United Nations challenged the norm of state sovereignty in favor of addressing humanitarian concerns. Russia vehemently opposed the NATO attack on Serbia and the Western support of the unilateral secession of Kosovo Albanians, ultimately using it to justify its challenges to the sovereignty of Georgia and Ukraine. This course is aimed at students seeking an understanding of both internal and international contexts of the birth, rise, and fall of the Yugoslav idea since the 19th century, including its three state articulations: the Kingdom of Yugoslavia, communist Yugoslavia and rump Yugoslavia. Students will earn their grade by writing literature reviews, essays, and reflections following site visits, as well as acting in simulations of several episodes of Yugoslav politics. Upon successfully completing this course, students will be able to identify key regional actors and major points of friction among them. Next, students will be able to rely on historical context in order to make sense out of everyday news from the Western Balkans. Lastly, they will be able to situate regional trends within the relevant framework of international powers’ interests and interactions in the Western Balkans.

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 3010

3 CREDITS

Instructor: Mladen Mrdalj

NATIONALISM, ETHNIC CONFLICT, AND POLITICAL VIOLENCE

Following the end of the Cold War, the wave of violent ethnic conflicts and civil wars in post-communist countries (especially in the former Yugoslavia) dwarfed the low-level political violence in the West. Western foreign policies and academic interest in identity-based political conflicts seemed to imply that identity driven violence became a non-Western form of contentious politics. However, the ongoing political turmoil in the West over identity politics and the rise of “identitarian movements” painfully reminds both academic and policy circles that identity conflicts are not exclusively a “non-Western” phenomena. What can both the East and the West learn from the legacy of Balkan ethno-nationalist conflicts and civil wars? How do shared identities emerge and collapse? Who produces identities? Are identities imposed or negotiated? Does conflict necessarily lead to violence? What forms of violence exist and what drives them? Are we mistakenly labeling ethnic conflicts as “ethnic”? This course will introduce students to major theories of ethnic and national identity formation, including theories of ethnic conflict and political violence. Students will be expected to show understanding of concepts and theories by writing essays and literature reviews and by participating in class debates. By the end of the course, students will learn theories of national identity formation, how to recognize them in everyday conversation, and why that is important. Next, students will become able to distinguish between ethnic and other types of political conflicts, conflict and violence, and various forms of violence. Lastly, students should become able to articulate an informed position on public policies concerning identity conflicts and their violent forms.

POLITICAL SCIENCE 2060

3 CREDITS

Instructor: Mladen Mrdalj

WHAT IS POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY?

What is politics? What is the purpose of politics? Is there a best regime? Is it attainable? What is justice? What is a good life? How is each related to political life? Is there a science of politics? In this course, we will raise these and other fundamental questions through a study of major ancient and modern works of political philosophy. Authors may include Plato, Aristotle, early Church Fathers, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Constant, Tocqueville, Mill, Marx, and Nietzsche. Students will be able to identify major philosophical figures, texts, topics, and movements from antiquity to the present, and develop a basic understanding of their philosophical interrelations and importance. Students will be able to read carefully and think critically about the studied texts, write clear, logically sound, and well-researched essays, and effectively discuss and present authors’ views. Students will be able to define fundamental concepts in political philosophy, identifying their historical development and the main debates surrounding them whilst integrating philosophical principles into everyday life, making them better and more thoughtful citizens.

POLITICAL SCIENCE 1010

3 CREDITS

Instructor: Damjan Krnjevic – Miskovic

POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY AND FOREIGN POLICY

After a brief consideration of contemporary debates on moralism versus realism in foreign policy, the fundamentally different positions of Aristotle and Machiavelli on the relative status of foreign and domestic policy are both examined. The course concludes with Thucydides, the relation of domestic institutions to foreign policy, and the role of justice in foreign affairs. Students will finish this course equipped with the understanding of fundamental concepts and debates guiding two historically dominant paradigms of foreign policy conduct. Furthermore, students’ future study of international relations theories and international relations in general will be greatly enhanced following deeper immersion in classical texts anchoring the academic discipline of international studies.

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 2010

3 CREDITS

Instructor: Damjan Krnjevic – Miskovic

ON TYRANNY

Tyranny has been called a “danger coeval with political life.” To understand the nature of tyranny as well as how technology and ideology have changed it over time, we will read texts, in whole or in part, by Plato (Apology and Republic), Aristotle (Politics), Xenophon (Hiero), Machiavelli (The Prince), Shakespeare (Macbeth), as well as essays by Leo Strauss, Alexandre Kojeve, Carl Schmitt (“The Concept of the Political”), Marx, Lenin, Heidegger (“Question Concerning Technology”), Francois Furet, and Hannah Arendt (“Origins of Totalitarianism”). Upon completing this course, students will be able to intervene with competence in political and philosophical debates about the authors and their approaches to the concept and practice of tyranny and its main forms. Furthermore, students will be able to integrate deeper understanding of tyranny with its contemporary manifestations and trends.

POLITICAL SCIENCE 1010

3 CREDITS

Instructor: Damjan Krnjevic – Miskovic

HOMER AND HERODOTUS: HUMAN DIVERSITY AND WORLD POLITICS

Both Homer and Herodotus inquire into the laws, customs, and ways of many nations, evaluating each on its own terms whilst claiming that these diverse parts somehow make up a coherent human whole. The bulk of this course will examine Homer’s Odyssey and Herodotus’s History and will end with a close reading of one of contemporary society’s most ambitious attempts to engage with the methodology contained in these two seminal works of Western thought, The Bridge on the Drina by the Nobel laureate Ivo Andric. Students will broaden their perspectives on the contemporary and historical diversity of guiding principles and forms of human organization. The concepts studied will help students confront theoretical, practical, and ethical problems of foreign policy and international interactions.

POLITICAL SCIENCE 2020

3 CREDITS

Instructor: Damjan Krnjevic – Miskovic

ANCIENT AND MODERN POLITICAL SPEECHWRITING

This course will examine the theory and practice of persuasive speech. The first part of the course will draw on excerpts from classical Greek and Roman authors, focusing on the distinction between persuasive speech (sophistry) and truth-telling (philosophy). The second half will consist of an examination of more recent speeches from around the world and requires students to write speeches themselves. Students will learn how to utilize the legacy of classical and contemporary speechwriting in order to sharpen the articulation of their thoughts and arguments in traditional and modern venues of social interaction.

POLITICAL SCIENCE 2030

3 CREDITS

Instructor: Damjan Krnjevic – Miskovic

INTRODUCTION TO MEDIA AND COMMUNICATION

This course provides a broad overview of key topics and theories in the fields of media and communication. This course would be well suited to those seeking both a basic introduction to the field and a continuation on these initial themes. While we will briefly touch upon interpersonal communication, the focus of this course is on public communication—journalism, mass and digital media. We will give special attention to key theories that are of interest to the field of political communication such as agenda setting, framing, priming, and cultivation theory, and discuss their application to the current digital media environment. We further examine the role of digital technology in changing media-related business models and the implications for freedom of expression and civic life. (Instructor: Tijana Milosevic)

MEDIA STUDIES 1100

3 CREDITS

Instructor: Tijana Milosevic

PRIVATIZED PUBLIC SPHERE: SOCIAL AND CIVIC IMPLICATIONS OF PLATFORM GOVERNANCE

That Google, Facebook, Amazon, and other online platforms have a significant impact on our everyday lives is perhaps obvious and redundant to point out. Yet with every media report revealing new data breaches, evolving commercial data collection strategies bordering surveillance, as well as election-meddling or fake-news scandals, the public gains novel levels of appreciation for the implications that platform governance has on social life and the public sphere. In this course, we will survey social science research on the implications of platform governance for safety, privacy, civic engagement and people’s well-being. We will examine various aspects of life where platforms play an increasingly important role, devoting special attention to emerging technologies such as the Internet of Things, and regulation and intermediary liability in specific contexts. Students will gain familiarity with key concepts and theories in the field of media and communication, as well as the ability to apply these in understanding and navigating the digital media environment. A critical outlook on new media developments will provide those majoring in other fields such as political science, sociology, psychology, and other social science fields with enhanced analytic skills necessary for understanding major developments in contemporary society.

MEDIA STUDIES 2100

3 CREDITS

Instructor: Tijana Milosevic

SEMINAR ON THE AMERICAN POLITICAL REGIME

This is a course in American political and constitutional thought. The theme, taken from Tocqueville’s Democracy in America, concerns the problem of freedom. The first half of the course covers the founding of America up through the Civil War and the “re-founding.” This includes Tocqueville, Madison’s Notes on the Debates in the Federal Convention, the Federalist-Anti-Federalist ratification debate, foundational Supreme Court decisions (Marbury, McCulloch), and the writings of Jefferson, Calhoun, and Lincoln. The second half considers basic problems in American politics, such as race, gender, foreign policy, and education. Readings include an American novel (for example the Autobiography of Malcolm X), Tocqueville, and Supreme Court decisions. Students, especially non-American students, will develop awareness of the founding debates of the American polity, and they will build a conceptual framework of the dominant ideas, principles, and practices shaping contemporary American society. Students will enhance their capacity to understand ongoing political developments in the United States and situate it within the larger context of American political heritage.

AMERICAN POLITICS 2010

3 CREDITS

Instructor: Damjan Krnjevic – Miskovic

TROLLING, CYBERBULLYING, HARASSMENT: TOWARD DIGITAL DIGNITY

With digital services growing both in number and versatility, it can appear that cyberbullying, trolling, and various forms of online harassment have become more pervasive than in the analog era. But is this indeed the case, or has our improved ability to capture instances of humiliation in the form of digital footprints made the problem more visible and easier to trace? This course delves into the pervasiveness and psychological implications of various forms of online harassment by surveying social science research on the issue. We will examine offline bullying as the analog predecessor to cyberbullying and we will do so in the contexts of adult as well as youth populations. What are the differences among various types of online harassment? What are the causes and policy and legal consequences of such behavior? Do solutions reside in the realm of regulation or in understanding cultural roots of humiliation as a violation of human dignity? After taking this course, students will have gained an advanced understanding of platform politics and the power dynamics in new media environments. Consequently, students will be able to apply this sophisticated understanding when developing policy recommendations in their own fields of work. Having in mind that platforms are involved in every aspect of daily life, understanding how they operate and the broader social implications of their operation will help students interested in jobs with various online platforms, positions in non-governmental organizations that address these issues, or relevant government positions.

MEDIA STUDIES 2200

3 CREDITS

Instructor: Tijana Milosevic

EVIL IN EASTERN EUROPE

Did you know that the word “vampire” comes from present day Serbia – NOT Romania? This course tackles this and other issues related to the problem of evil in Eastern European folklore and culture, beginning from the Dark Ages. Specifically, we uncover the origins of popular monsters, such as vampires, werewolves, mermaids, etc., and deconstruct how they are represented in popular media based on their origins in the folklore of the Slavic and Eastern European peoples.
We tackle a variety of scholarly areas, including: etymology (where the names of these monsters come from and what they mean); forensic science (how are the dead disposed of and how do they interact with the living in pre-Enlightenment cultures); history (the developments related to the Hapsburg domination of Eastern Europe and the Ottoman suzerainty in the Balkans; the rise of the Bolsheviks and the obliteration of backwardness associated with religion and superstition), etc.
The student will acquire essential knowledge about Eastern European and Slavic cultures that can be used as a starting point for continued studies in more specialized topics from the areas, including language, history, and literature studies.

CULTURE 2020

3 CREDITS

Instructor: James Joshua Pennington

STRUCTURE OF SLAVIC LANGUAGES

This course presents and overview of the structure of three branches of Slavic: East, South, and West, focusing on the languages of professor Pennington’s specialization, Russian, Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian, and Czech, respectively. We will begin by looking at the reconstructed Proto-Slavic language looked like and follow the branch-specific developments down to the modern state for each language. We will spend 2 weeks on Proto-Slavic, before moving on to developments leading to Russian, then two weeks for Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian, followed by 2 weeks dedicated to Czech. The last two weeks will be spent looking at similarities among the three branches, and looking more closely at some dialects which challenge traditional classification as either East, South, or West Slavic.
Students are advised to take this course in conjunction with their language studies (preferably a Slavic language) to gain the maximum benefit from in-depth analysis of linguistic structure.

SLAVIC 2010

3 CREDITS

Instructor: James Joshua Pennington

BOSNIAN-CROATIAN-SERBIAN

Students (at the appropriately placed level, after proficiency testing) will improve their proficiency in all areas of language structure, spanning Introductory to Advanced levels. We will take a communicative approach to learning, by immersing ourselves in the local color, including trips in and around Belgrade and utilizing the daily media to emphasize areas of grammar that are pertinent to each lesson. We will increase our vocabularies substantially, while also engaging in speaking from the earliest levels. Our goal is to move up one level per semester, i.e. A1 to A2, B1 to B2, etc. Final projects in each course will include making a professional presentation in the student’s area of specialization (PowerPoint, interview with a native speaker, etc.).
Professor Pennington also will introduce many cultural aspects into the classroom, including song (he plays the guitar and sings), folklore, and history.

SLAVIC 1050

3 CREDITS

Instructor: James Joshua Pennington

HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT

This course is designed to study major economic thinkers and their contributions to economic theory and policy from the 18th century to the present. We will read original texts and learn about lives and work of some of the most important contributors to economics and political economy: Adam Smith, John Stuart Mill, Karl Marx, John Maynard Keynes, F. A. Hayek, Milton Friedman, and more. We will explore how intellectual currents and ideas influenced economic thought in the past, and how, in turn, the works of key economists have shaped their world. At the end of the course students will be able to understand how economics evolved to its present state, to compare major traditions in economic thought, to critically examine different schools of thought, and put present-time policy debates in the appropriate historic and intellectual context.

ECONOMICS 1080

3 CREDITS

Instructor: Slavisa Tasic

ECONOMIC GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT

Why are some countries rich and others poor? We do not know it yet, but we do have a number of theories and a great deal of accumulated empirical evidence to help us search for answers. This course introduces the essentials concepts of economic growth and growth accounting, and presents major theories of growth. The course takes an international perspective. We search for the causes of the Western Great Enrichment since the 19th century and the more recent drivers of economic development in the rest of the world. We discuss the institutional background of economic growth and the growing concerns with equity and income distribution related to modern and future economic growth. At the end of the course, students will be very familiar with the indicators of economic performance, income and welfare, understand interrelationships between capital, labor, technology, and other factors of economic growth, will be able to critically analyze alternative economic development policies, and will be comfortable with the debates revolving around economic growth and development both historically and in the present. 

ECONOMICS 2070

3 CREDITS

Instructor: Slavisa Tasic

INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

This advanced undergraduate course in International Financial Management aims at providing students with a working knowledge and in-depth understanding of both financing and investment alternatives in the globalized financial arena. The context of the course will be international financial issues of importance to multinational corporations, international investors, global bankers, and foreign trade firms as well as to government officials placed in ministries of economy, trade, foreign affairs, or central banks. First, we will study the global macroeconomic environment in which the internationally engaged or cross-border challenged local firms operate in. The second and third parts of the course will analyze exchange rate theory and policy, together with various facets of FX risk and techniques of FX risk management. The fourth segment will examine international financing facilities of different maturities available from public and supranational sources. The fifth and sixth segments of the course will deal with long and short-term private sources of international financing, coupled with some multinational corporate management issues worth considering. The last topic covered will concern the recent global financial meltdown and both the private and sovereign debt crises that followed, including the potential of currency unions to avoid original sin problems and the legacy and takeaways from European monetary integration and the ongoing Eurozone crisis. Mastering international risk assessment, students will learn to read and analyze balance of payments and become familiar with the exchange rate and FX risk management. Also, they will begin to evaluate different international financing sources and instruments, international capital budgeting, and international cash management. Students will become familiar with global financial crises, the Eurozone’s past and present, and sovereign debt problems.

ECONOMICS 3010

3 CREDITS

Instructor: Marko Malovic

OPEN-ECONOMY MACRO: A TRANSITION COUNTRY’S PERSPECTIVE

This advanced undergraduate course in Open-Economy Macroeconomics builds on several applied topics that combine the economics of the transitions of small, open, post-socialist countries with macroeconomic adjustment and development issues in small, open, economies hit by various aspects of financial crisis. We will deal with the significance of inherited institutions versus the impact of external actors in post-communist transition in addition to economic reforms in Central and Southeast Europe. The course additionally covers the macroeconomic dynamics of small, open economies in transition, with special emphasis on the role of non-tradable goods, financial and labor market imperfections, real anchors and stabilization programs, viability of export-led growth in the (post)globalized world, as well as dollarization phenomena. The last segment of the course sets out to conduct an in-depth analysis of the causes, contagion channels, different breeds, and consequences of international financial crises (currency crises, balance of payment crises, twin crises, and the like) from a developing transition country’s viewpoint. Mastering this course will enable students not only to substantially broaden their knowledge and understanding of small open emerging markets, but also to develop both intuition and technical ability to apply modern macroeconomic theory in practice of small, open transition economies.

ECONOMICS 3020

3 CREDITS

Instructor: Marko Malovic

MODERN APPROACHES TO CORRUPTION

Why do some countries grow out of corruption while others seem to become more embroiled the more they fight it? This course focuses on how we define, measure, and fight corruption and why this is important. It describes the definitions and indicators which govern the thinking shaping anti-corruption policies. We will examine the phenomenon of corruption through various methodological lenses. Course participants will study international development, law, political science, and political sociology in order to grasp multifaceted approaches to this problem. The few successful anti-corruption campaigns from recent memory will be examined in this course, as well as many failures in policy designs, political outcomes, and European integration projects. At the end of the course, students will be able to critically analyze empirical findings and the theoretical background of legal efforts to curb corruption, grasp the role that patronism and clientelism play in the political sphere of corruption affected countries, and understand how corruption can be measured, defined and fought and why this battle is so essential and difficult.

PUBLIC POLICY 2010

3 CREDITS

Instructor: Nedim Hogic

EUROPEANIZATION AND INTERNATIONAL STATE-BUILDING POLICIES IN THE BALKANS

Ravaged in the 1990’s conflict and the ensuing transition from communism to capitalism, the Western Balkans has served as a playground for international efforts to modernize and transform divided and impoverished societies. The challenges faced were enormous: transitional justice, privatization, European Union integration, economic liberalization, ethnic divisions and hatred, brain drain, and, more recently, the response to the “Migrant Crisis”. This course will examine the processes, outcomes, and failures of the efforts of local and international actors to overcome these challenges. Focusing on the first-hand experiences of the lecturer and guest lecturers from the region, the course will attempt to engage and provoke thoughts on why and how state-building works or does not. The course will also feature political, sociological, and legal insights into Western Balkan societies and the modus operandi of technical assistance provided by donors. At the end of the course, students will understand the successes and failures of different approaches to transitional justice in the Balkans, the process of European integration in the Western Balkans, and the role that the main stakeholders play in state-building, examining stakeholders such as international organizations and global powers. Students will come to understand the role these players play in these processes, the critiques of state-building efforts, and the factors determining the success or failure of the rule of law reform projects.

PUBLIC POLICY 2020

3 CREDITS

Instructor: Nedim Hogic

FORCED MIGRATIONS ALONG THE “BALKAN ROUTE”: BRIDGING THE MIDDLE EAST AND EUROPE

This course will explore some of the key issues arising from the conflict-driven displacement of people, both across internationally recognized state borders (refugeehood) and within their own countries (internal displacement). It will introduce the international institutional and legal frameworks set up to respond to the forcible displacement of people, and address the questions of the political, socio-economic, and cultural ramifications of forced migration for both host countries and societies, and for displaced populations themselves. In an attempt to develop an understanding of regional dynamics, the course will also explore the issue of the forcible displacement of population that occurred as a result of the armed conflicts following the breakup of the Yugoslav federation, and the limits of the international policymaking and strategies employed concerning this question. Finally, a special emphasis will be given to the ongoing European refugee crisis, focusing on the so-called “Balkan Route” as the main channel enabling refugees from Western Asia, South Asia, and Africa to move towards Central and Western Europe, the Balkan states’ response to the increased refugee flows since 2015, and these countries’ role in the management of EU border politics. This course will combine theoretical approaches, different case studies, site visits, and guest lectures in an attempt to “humanize” migrants and refugees who we tend to perceive as distant and different from ourselves. This course’s assessment of the international policymaking in the post-conflict societies of Southeast Europe will teach students how to think about improving policies serving both displaced population groups and their hosts. Students will be equipped with the historical, political, and legal knowledge necessary for recognizing the challenges put before the countries on the so-called “Balkan Route,” including the complexities and dynamics of the ongoing migration flow towards Central and Western Europe. Finally, students will gain a better understanding of what it means to be a refugee or an internally displaced person, and how the experience of forcible displacement influences these people’s identities, sense of “belonging,” and understanding of themselves in relation to the world and the world in relation to themselves.

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 2030

3 CREDITS

Instructor: Maja Maksimovic

CULTURAL POLICIES OF POST-CONFLICT RECONSTRUCTION IN SOUTHEAST EUROPE

The course will address how the post-conflict societies in Southeast Europe have struggled to recover after the 1990s civil wars. The emphasis will be on how the past affects their present lives, the responses to reconciliation efforts and transitional justice mechanisms, and the experience of cultural transformations. Hence, the approach will be multidisciplinary, involving political science, sociology, international relations, conflict studies, anthropology, and cultural studies. Importantly, while never losing sight of the concrete, externally-imposed policies introduced and implemented by the international community, this course will aim to primarily employ a bottom-up approach, giving primacy to individual over collective experiences, opinions, and evaluations. In this way, by comparing individual to collective, internal to external, and bottom-up to top-down, the course will illuminate the roles of different actors, structures, and processes in post-conflict reconstruction; it will inspire debates on the reach of the international and state policymaking within this particular region, and it will encourage students to better their own understanding of contemporary Southeast Europe societies. Upon completing this course, students will become familiar with Southeast Europe’s cultures and societies and gain better understanding of how the 1990’s armed conflicts affected people’s everyday lives. Students will learn how war shaped and re-shaped people’s identities, how people remember and narrate the past, how they deal with their traumas and losses, and how to challenge the dominant cultural discourses. Building upon the lessons of the semester-long immersion in the Southeast European political narratives, students will be able to theorize about post-conflict cultural reconstruction and apply their conclusions to other post-conflict regions in the world.

POLITICAL SCIENCE 2040

3 CREDITS

Instructor: Maja Maksimovic

SOCIOLOGY OF SOCIAL CHANGE

The course provides a social scientific approach to change, addressing the interrelated
macro-sociological questions and topics such as: concepts which define the scope of sociological research on social change; classical theories of social change and their reception in contemporary sociological discussions; sociological explanations of long-term developmental processes (eg. the rise of capitalism, socialist alternatives, social movements, revolutions, etc); social modernization processes and their contemporary dimensions and consequences (agrarian reform, urbanization, creation of the state, development of the world order, etc); components of change (population growth, demographic transition, culture, social structure, systems, and processes); characteristics of contemporary (post-) modern societies and the trends in their changes; and the production, distribution, and creation of culture in a changing world. It is expected that the course will equip students with knowledge that allows for the understanding of the key processes that led to the emergence of modern societies, the characteristics of modern societies, and their changing directions and trends, as well as the ability to use more complex theoretical knowledge in independent analysis of the characteristics of modern society.

SOCIOLOGY 1010

3 CREDITS

Instructor: Tamara P. Trost

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT

The primary goal of this course is to help students gain knowledge about international business environment and its specifics. The most important topics to be covered include: globalization, financial flows, migration, drivers of and barriers to globalization; the global economy, economic growth, the global environment; international trade theory, competitive advantage, and trade restrictions; foreign direct investments, assessing country attractiveness, and entering foreign markets; the socio-cultural frameworks (stereotypes, culture, the social environment, demography); the political environment; influence of the state on business, and of organizations/firms on the state; financial institutions, markets, crises and regulation; sources of law and institutions, including international law and the EU institutions, whistleblowing, internet, business & security; sources of technological advance and protection of technology; and lastly, corporate social responsibility, the ecological environment and sustainability. By the end of the course, students will develop competencies in source collection, a better understanding of business environment diversity, and its regulations and changes, and comprehending different modes and ways of doing international business by addressing entry strategies and relations between mother firms and units.

ECONOMICS 2010

3 CREDITS

Instructor: Tamara P. Trost

CIVIL SOCIETY AND POLITICAL CULTURE IN SOUTH-EASTERN EUROPE

This course explores the concept of civil society and political culture in South-Eastern Europe. By exploring contemporary and historical perspectives on the relationships between society and politics, this course draws on historical, anthropological, sociological, and political science approaches in understanding this relationship. The class focuses on the impact of authoritarianism on state-society relations, the role of identity and ethnicity, social movements, media, religion, and the impact of family structures and gender roles on the relationship between society and state. Contemporary themes include interpreting Balkan nationalism and the rise of populist and right-wing groups (‘uncivil society’). Upon completing this course, students should become familiar with the dynamic relationship between states’ attempts at stabilizing official narratives and identity fluctuations in societies across the region. Furthermore, students should be able to meaningfully integrate class discussions, readings, and reflections with their personal experience of local society acquired during the semester in the Balkans. Upon leaving the region, students should be able to better recognize and analyze dynamic and contested state-society relationship in other countries and regions as well.

SOCIOLOGY 3010

3 CREDITS

Instructor: Tamara P. Trost

EUROPEAN BUSINESS LAW

The European Union is one of the world’s largest and most important economies, increasingly recognized as a threat by the administration of the current US president Donald Trump. Therefore, its legal system and especially business law regulations have very significant roles in the global economy. This course will provide students with an insight into the complex system of regulations that make up European business law. The topics range from considering the basic structures and principles of the European Union to focusing on various areas of business law. In the first part, the course will give the students an understanding of the laws and policies that regulate the internal market of European Union, as well as relevant case law and guiding inputs from leading practitioners in the field. In the second part of the course, focus will be on the main legal acts that regulate various aspects of establishing and running a business within the European Union. In the final part, dedicated to business competition in Europe, we will go into more depth about how to compete on the internal market and protect brands, products, and inventions. This course should equip students with the fundamentals of the legal regulation of companies and other business entities and their commercial activities in the European Union’s internal market. Furthermore, students will grow their awareness of the European Union’s law’s impact on the progressive harmonization of member states’ and candidate countries’ regulations, including the role of the European Union’s courts in regulating the internal market.

LAW 2010

3 CREDITS

Instructor: Djuro Djuric

CORPORATE CRISES

This course will introduce students to legal, financial, and political aspects of cases of corporate difficulties. Typical methods employed in this course will be comparative methods and case studies. The course will start with the most important global cases of corporate difficulties preceding the 2008 financial crisis and then it will move to the particular cases in different markets. The course will be closed with the review of best practices and instruments applied in successful cases of overcoming corporate crises. Since this is a dynamic topic, we will continuously update our course with new cases and new legislative, economic, and political aspects. In general, there will be three assignments during the semester. Students will write and analyze a particular case, evaluate the implemented legislative, economic, and political instruments, and discuss class material. The course will start by familiarizing students with traditional legislation and corporate governance before the 2008 crisis erupted. We will explore how different financial instruments weakened the market position of banks, financial institutions, and big corporations, as well as the consequences of their corporate troubles on the domestic and international markets and economies. Students will also learn how state and international organizations reacted in order to overcome the crises. Finally, new legislative and economic approaches will be presented by exploring how corporate crisis affected legislative politics in selected European countries: EU and non-EU, rich and poor, former communist countries and those who were not. This course will familiarize students with procedures addressing financial and management crises within a broader approach to strategic crisis management. Students will also learn how to plan effective crisis solutions. Lastly, students should be able to comprehend and compute potential effects of both successful and unsuccessful crisis management on key stakeholders, corporate balance sheet and organizational standing, and on shareholders’ value and long-term institutional value.

LAW 3010

3 CREDITS

Instructor: Djuro Djuric

EXERCISING LEADERSHIP: AN INTRODUCTION

This course will examine three different leadership frameworks; Adaptive Leadership, Community Organizing, and Public Narrative. At the heart of these three frameworks is the principle that leadership is a practice; thereby making the exercise of leadership a choice for any individual facing challenges in his/her/their environment, organization, community, or nation. It breaks the traditional thinking of equating the leader with a person with authority. Practicing leadership is also critical as an enabler of agency; the capacity of people to act independently and to make their own choices. The purpose of the course is to widen one’s understanding of how to lead with and without authority, across different boundaries and power structures, and from any position, whether in an organization or in society. In a world in which most organizations, communities, and societies face enormous challenges and uncertainty, the practice of leadership is critical in order to enable individuals and communities to mobilize and organize for change. The course will introduce five organizing practices: relationship building, public narrative (telling your public story), structuring, strategizing, and action. This includes an introduction to the five components through case studies and some practical exercises with an in depth focus on Public Narrative.

ONLINE COURSE

3 CREDITS

Instructor: Nikola Ilic

INTERNSHIP MODULE

Students doing an internship in Belgrade will be required to write a bi-weekly reflection on their ongoing work and life experience. Reflections should touch upon the relationship with the internship supervisor, description of the work environment, tasks performed, and commuting experience. Reflections should also evidence students’ interest in current international and local news relevant to their internship. Students will meet at least once a week with the supervising professors at the ICGS (academic supervisors) to discuss their internship experience and how it fits students’ majors and/or classes taken with the ICGS. Students will also be required to select readings relevant for the internship from the list of readings provided by the internship supervisor and/or academic supervisors. By the end of the internship, students will write a five to seven page final paper containing an analysis of their overall internship experience and policy recommendations addressed to their internship supervisor. Restrictions in writing reflections and the final paper will apply in case a host institution would request some information not to be disclosed. Internship advisors must inform the academic advisor about any such requirement concerning business confidentiality.

INTERNSHIP

3 CREDITS

Academic supervisors: all ICGS faculty members